Month: May 2020

GrowthBar Review: Best Google Chrome Extension for SEO

Last updated on

growthbar review

SEOs rely heavily on tools when doing processes like keyword research and backlink analysis. However, most of the things that you need to rank for can be found right in the search results and by studying your competitors.

Most of the time, you have multiple tabs opened, using one tool per task so you go back and forth on multiple tools. Google Chrome extensions are a great way to reduce the time spent in these tasks and we just found the best chrome extension available in the market.

I’m talking about GrowthBar. A tool created by the awesome folks at Growth Marketing Pro. I’ve been using GrowthBar a lot and I’m loving it. Here’s my full review of the tool.

What is GrowthBar?

GrowthBar is a Google Chrome extension that provides SEO analysis straight from the Google search results. You could use Google search to look for any keywords that you want and GrowthBar will provide you insights that you need whether it’s for keyword research, competitor analysis, and more.

Before I continue with this review, you might want to try and install GrowthBar. You could do so by visiting this link: GrowthBar SEO Chrome Plugin. They are offering a 5-day free trial. 

GrowthBar Features

Once you install GrowthBar and turn on the tool, it is activated right away once you open a new tab of Google search. Here’s a view of the overall look:

Keyword difficulty

When searching for a keyword, a score will be found right beside the search bar which indicates how difficult it is to rank for the keyword that you searched for. This is really helpful as it helps you assess if you should go for this keyword or look for an easier keyword to rank for.

Keyword suggestions

This, in my opinion, is the highlight of this tool. Once you search for a keyword, there is a section where you can see a few other related keywords suggested by GrowthBar as well as their search volume and cost per click if you are running ads. Once you click the See more button, you’ll see a full list of recommendations and you can even download a CSV file so you could store the data.

Domain Authority and Top Backlinks

This feature is very useful for competitor analysis. GrowthBar shows you the domain authority of a website. And then you could check the top linking websites if you want to find out more how to beat your competitors. Similar to the keyword suggestions, clicking the See more button will show you the full list of the website’s linked domains. It will provide domain authority for each as well. You could also download the list as a CSV file if you want to keep a record.

Top Organic and Paid Keywords

Using GrowthBar, you could view the top keywords a website is ranking for both organic and paid ads keywords and see their position on it. Another great tool for keyword research and competitor analysis.

Facebook Ads

Clicking the Facebook Ads button on GrowthBar will show you the ads a website is running on Facebook. This is a great way to spy on your competitors and be ahead of their social media marketing campaigns.

Word Count

GrowthBar is able to give you the word count of a webpage without the hassle of copying and pasting their content on a word file. Though it has been said before that word count does not affect rankings, long-form content or deep content is still recommended. 

My Thoughts on GrowthBar

My experience has been great so far using GrowthBar. Just seeing all the data that I need while surfing through Google is exactly what I wanted for an SEO Chrome extension. It’s compact and easy to use. It saves me and my team a lot of time because it eliminates the repetitive actions of switching in another tab then analyzing websites one by one on different SEO tools. I get the data that I need without having to leave the search results.

However, I think GrowthBar could add more data and metrics to allow for a more in-depth analysis. But still, it doesn’t take away the versatility of the tool since you can have data for literally any keyword that you search for.

GrowthBar Pricing

GrowthBar costs 49 dollars per month which is relatively cheaper than most SEO tools. But if you want to check out the tools first before making a purchase, they are offering a 5-day free trial that you could use by going to this link.

Final Verdict

I would definitely recommend GrowthBar as it is a valuable tool especially for digital marketing companies running multiple campaigns for multiple businesses. I think it’s really worth it since it doesn’t limit the number of searches that you do so you literally can analyze unlimited amounts of keywords and websites. It doesn’t take a lot of power on your computer or laptop, it’s user-friendly, and could definitely increase your efficiency.

GrowthBar Review: Best Google Chrome Extension for SEO was originally posted by Video And Blog Marketing

Job Search Engine Using Occupation Vectors

I worked for the Courts of Delaware at Superior Court.

I started working there as the Assistant Criminal Deputy Prothonotary.

I changed positions after 7 years there, and I became a Mini/Micro Computer Network Administrator.

The Court used an old English title for that first position which meant that I supervised Court Clerks in the Criminal Department of the Court. In the second position, I never ever saw a mini/micro-computer but it was a much more technical position. I was reminded of those titles when writing this post.

What unusual job titles might you have held in the past?

A Job Search Engine Based on Occupation Vectors and a Job Identification Model

An Example of Job Search at Google:

job search example

For a two week period, Google was granted patents with the same name each of those 2 weeks. This is the first of the two patents during that period granted under the name “Search Engine.”

It is about a specific type of search engine. One that focuses upon a specific search vertical – A Job Search Engine.

The second patent granted under the name “Search Engine,” was one that focused upon indexing data related to applications on mobile devices. I wrote about it in the post A Native Application Vertical Search Engine at Google

The reason why I find it important to learn about and understand how these new “Search Engine” patents work is that they adopt some newer approaches to answering searches than some of the previous vertical search engines developed by Google. Understanding how they work may provide some ideas about how older searches at Google may have changed.

This Job Search Engine patent works with a job identification model to enhance job search by improving the quality of search results in response to a job search query.

We are told that the job identification model can identify relevant job postings that could otherwise go unnoticed by conventional algorithms due to inherent limitations of keyword-based searching. What implications does this have for organic search at Google that has focused upon keyword search?

This job search may use methods in addition to conventional keyword-based searching. It uses an identification model that can identify relevant job postings which include job titles that do not match the keywords of a received job search query.

So, the patent tells us that in a query using the words “Patent Guru,” the job identification model may identify postings related to a:

  • “Patent Attorney”
  • “Intellectual Property Attorney”
  • “Attorney”
  • the like

The method behind job searching may include (remember the word “vector.” It is one I am seeing from Google a lot lately):

  • Defining a vector vocabulary
  • Defining an occupation taxonomy includings multiple different occupations
  • Obtaining multiple labeled training data items, wherein each labeled training data item is associated with at least:
    • (i) a job title
    • (ii) an occupation
  • Generating an occupation vector which includes a feature weight for each respective term in the vector vocabulary
  • Associating each respective occupation vector with an occupation in the occupation taxonomy based on the occupation of the labeled training data item used to generate the occupation vector
  • Receiving a search query that includes a string related to a characteristic of one or more potential job opportunities, generating a first vector based on the received query
  • Determining, for each respective occupation of the multiple occupations in the occupation taxonomy, a confidence score that is indicative of whether the query vector is correctly classified in the respective occupation
  • Selecting the particular occupation that is associated with the highest confidence score
  • Obtaining one or more job postings using the selected occupation
  • Providing the obtained job postings in a set of search results in response to the search query

These operations may include:

  • Receiving a search query that includes a string related to a characteristic of one or more job opportunities
  • Generating, based on the query, a query vector that includes a feature weight for each respective term in a predetermined vector vocabulary
  • Determining, for each respective occupation of the multiple occupations in the occupation taxonomy, a confidence score that is indicative of whether the query vector is correctly classified in the respective occupation
  • Selecting the particular occupation that is associated with the highest confidence score
  • Obtaining one or more job postings using the selected occupation, and providing the obtained job postings in a set of search results in response to the search query
  • Feature Weights for Terms in Vector Vocabularies

    It sounds like Google is trying to understand job position titles and how they may be connected with each other, and developing a vector vocabulary, and build ontologies of related positions

    A feature weight may be based on:

    • A term frequency determined on a number of occurrences of each term in the job title of the training data item
    • An inverse occupation frequency that is determined based on a number of occupations in the occupation taxonomy where each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item is present.
    • An occupation derivative based on a density of each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item across each of the respective occupations in the occupation taxonomy
    • Both (i) a second value representing the inverse occupation frequency that is determined based, at least in part, on a number of occupations in the occupation taxonomy where each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item is present and (ii) a third value representing an occupation derivative that is based, at least in part, on a density of each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item across each of the respective occupations in the occupation taxonomy
    • A sum of (i) the second value representing the inverse occupation frequency, and (ii) one-third of the third value representing the occupation derivative

    The predetermined vector vocabulary may include terms that are present in training data items stored in a text corpus and terms that are not present in at least one training data item stored in the text corpus.

    This Job Search Engine Patent can be found at:

    Search engine
    Inventors: Ye Tian, Seyed Reza Mir Ghaderi, Xuejun Tao), Matthew Courtney, Pei-Chun Chen, and Christian Posse
    Assignee: Google LLC
    US Patent: 10,643,183
    Granted: May 5, 2020
    Filed: October 18, 2016

    Abstract

    Methods, systems, and apparatus, including computer programs encoded on storage devices, for performing a job opportunity search. In one aspect, a system includes a data processing apparatus, and a computer-readable storage device having stored thereon instructions that, when executed by the data processing apparatus, cause the data processing apparatus to perform operations.

    The operations include defining a vector vocabulary, defining an occupation taxonomy that includes multiple different occupations, obtaining multiple labeled training data items, wherein each labeled training data item is associated with at least (i) a job title, and (ii) an occupation, generating, for each of the respective labeled training data items, an occupation vector that includes a feature weight for each respective term in the vector vocabulary and associating each respective occupation vector with an occupation in the occupation taxonomy based on the occupation of the labeled training data item used to generate the occupation vector.

    The Job Identification Model

    Job identification model

    Job postings from many different sources may be related to one or more occupations.

    An occupation may include a particular category that encompasses one or more job titles that describe the same profession.

    Two or more of the obtained job postings may be related to the same, or substantially similar, occupation while using different terminology to describe a job title for each of the two or more particular job postings.

    Such differences in the terminology used to describe a particular job title of a job posting may arise for a variety of different reasons:

    • Different people from different employers draft each respective job posting
    • Unique job titles may be based on the culture of the employer’s company, the employer’s marketing strategy, or the like

    occupation taxonomy

    How an Job Identification Model May Work

    An example:

    1. At a first hair salon marketed as a rugged barbershop, advertises a job posting for a “barber”
    2. At a second hair salon marketed as a trendy beauty salon, advertises a job posting for a “stylist”
    3. At both, the job posting seeks a person for the occupation of a “hairdresser” who cuts and styles hair
    4. In a search system limited to keyword-based searching, a searcher seeking job opportunities for a “hairdresser” searchings for job opportunities using the term “barber” may not receive available job postings for a “stylist,” “hairdresser,” or the like if those job postings do not include the term “barber”
    5. The process in this patent uses a job identification model seeking to address this problem

    The job occupation model includes:

    • A classification unit
    • An occupation taxonomy

    The occupation taxonomy associates known job titles from existing job posts with one or more particular occupations.

    During training, the job identification model associates each occupation vector that was generated for an obtained job posting with an occupation in the occupation taxonomy.

    The classification unit may receive the search query and generate a query vector.

    The classification unit may access the occupation taxonomy and calculate, for each particular occupation in the occupation taxonomy, a confidence score that is indicative of the likelihood that the query vector is properly classified into each particular occupation of the multiple occupations in the occupation taxonomy.

    Then, the classification unit may select the occupation associated with the highest confidence score as the occupation that is related to the query vector and provide the selected occupation to the job identification model.

    An Example of a Search Under this Job Opportunities Search Engine:

    1. A searcher queries “Software Guru” into a search box
    2. The search query may be received by the job identification model
    3. The job identification model provides an input to the classification unit including the query
    4. The classification unit generates a query vector
    5. The classification unit analyzes the query vector in view of the one or more occupation vectors that were generated and associated with each particular occupation in the occupation taxonomy such as occupation vectors
    6. The classification unit may then determine that the query vector is associated with a particular occupation based on a calculated confidence score, and select the particular occupation
    7. The job identification model may receive the particular occupation from the classification unit
    8. Alternatively, or in addition, the output from the classification unit may include a confidence score that indicates the likelihood that the query vector is related to the occupation output by the occupation taxonomy
    9. The occupation output from the occupation taxonomy can be used to retrieve relevant job postings
    10. Specifically, given the output of a particular occupation, the job identification model can retrieve one or more job postings using a job posting index that stores references to job postings based on occupation type

    11. The references to job postings that were identified using the job posting index are returned to the user device
    12. The obtained references to job postings may be displayed on the graphical user interface
    13. The obtained references to job postings may be presented as search results and include references to job postings for a “Senior Programmer,” a “Software Engineer,” a “Software Ninja,” or the like
    14. The job postings included in the search results were determined to be responsive to the search query “Software Guru” based at least in part on the vector analysis of the query vector and one or more occupation vectors used to train the occupation taxonomy and not merely based on keyword searching alone

    Takeaways About this Job Search Engine

    In addition to the details about, the patent tells us how an occupation taxonomy may be trained, using training data. It also provides more details about the Job identification model. And then tells us about how a job search is performed using that job identification model.

    I mentioned above that this job search engine patent and the application search engine patent are using methods that we may see in other search verticals at Google. I have written about one approach that could be used in Organic search in the post Google Using Website Representation Vectors to Classify with Expertise and Authority

    Another one of those may involve image searching at Google. I’ve written about Google Image Search Labels Becoming More Semantic?

    I will be posting more soon about how Google Image search is using neural networks to categorize and cluster Images to return in search results.


    Copyright © 2020 SEO by the Sea ⚓. This Feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this material in your news aggregator, the site you are looking at may be guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact SEO by the Sea, so we can take appropriate action immediately.
    Plugin by Taragana

    Job Search Engine Using Occupation Vectors was originally posted by Video And Blog Marketing

    How to Choose the Perfect Top Level Domain

    Last updated on

    How to Choose the Perfect Top Level Domain_Cover Photo

    A top-level domain or much better known as TLD is usually the last part of a website’s address. For most websites, their TLD would be .com, .net, or .org – the most common ones. But when we use ccTLDs or country code top-level domains, it changes to .com.ph, or just .ph, .kr, .au, etc. You have a variety of choices as a webmaster for your website’s TLD. Unlike the second level domain where 

    Your second-level domain or SLD – the domain name or phrase before the TLD – is the easy part since you can use your brand name for it. But deciding between the hundreds of TLDs you can use can be time-consuming. So, how do you choose the perfect TLD for your website?

    How to Choose Your Top Level Domain

    Example of normal top level and second level domain

    Your domain name is your brand’s digital and search representative which makes sense that you put in as much importance in it as your other facets since it will be one of your driving forces for marketing and reaching out to a wider audience. Yes, most brands opt to choose their own brand name as their second-level domain with the generic .com as the TLD, however, this isn’t always as easy as it sounds since choosing domain names do have some obstacles if you’re unlucky.

    There are instances where the generic .com TLD for your brand isn’t available. So, this allows you to find chances to use a better TLD than the generic .com, however, this also contains a risk where you choose the wrong TLD – this could not be reversed and you have to buy and develop a new domain. 

    So, how exactly do we choose the top-level domain?

    • Consider Your Brand

    Example of unique top level domain

    Always remember that if you want to be successful in the digital landscape, your website is one of the most important facets you need. This means that your domain name (including your TLD) is, in one way or another, affects how your audience perceives your brand. 

    As I’ve mentioned, .com is a generic and commonly used TLD; you can use this to your advantage. Make use of unique TLDs that can attract your audience and potential visitor’s attention. Of course, you need to consider your brand identity. You can’t use an unrelated TLD for your domain name. Let’s say for example, your preferred domain name (and business name) is southsideveterinarian, you can’t use a random TLD like .soccer since it’s unrelated and it doesn’t mean anything for your business. This does not only result in a bad domain name, but it also affects how your audience and visitors perceive your brand/website. But if you use a related TLD like .pet or .clinic is both unique, attention-grabbing, and improves your audience’s perception of your brand. 

    Lastly, your TLD also affects how trustworthy your website is to your audience and visitors. There are TLDs that can be perceived as unsafe or not trustworthy so it’s important to be wary of this.

    • Consider Your Target Market

    As an SEO services agency, we take into account our client’s target market is important, especially if we’re developing their website. A TLD is important for your target market, more specifically, a ccTLD. This is important for your target market (and SEO) is because your ccTLD serves as a signal to Google and other search engines that you’re trying to rank higher in the search engine’s country-specific version. So, for most of our clients in the Philippines, their ccTLDs are either .com.ph or just .ph for their website to signal the search engine that we want the client website to rank in Google.com.ph.

    Of course, there are disadvantages here. Having a ccTLD drives an obstacle in ranking for the international or global search market. But if you or your client is absolutely sure that they just want to target a specific location, then ccTLDs are not a problem.

    • Consider Your SEO

    There are two things you have to remember when considering your SEO when choosing a TLD for your domain name:

    • ccTLDs will work best if you or your client is clear on your target market. ccTLDs are not effective in the international search market but are extremely effective for hyper-focused local search market efforts.
    • Generic TLDs like .com and .net are more effective for the international and broader market. However, this does not mean that generic TLDs are more effective in ranking in ALL search engines. Ranking is dependent on the efforts done, quality of the website and its content, and its authority in its industry. 

    Key Takeaway

    Your domain’s TLD isn’t something that you can just decide on without proper consideration. It affects multiple factors inside your website and it can also spell your website’s success or failure in the future. So, does your domain’s TLD matter THAT much in the whole scheme of digital marketing? Yes. The most obvious reason is without the TLD, you won’t have a website to work on. Another reason is when you properly choose a TLD, it can help in your SEO efforts, albeit only by a little bit. What do you think about choosing the perfect TLD? Let me know in the comments below!

    How to Choose the Perfect Top Level Domain was originally posted by Video And Blog Marketing

    Job Search Engine Using Occupation Vectors

    I worked for the Courts of Delaware at Superior Court.

    I started working there as the Assistant Criminal Deputy Prothonotary.

    I changed positions after 7 years there, and I became a Mini/Micro Computer Network Administrator.

    The Court used an old English title for that first position which meant that I supervised Court Clerks in the Criminal Department of the Court. In the second position, I never ever saw a mini/micro-computer but it was a much more technical position. I was reminded of those titles when writing this post.

    What unusual job titles might you have held in the past?

    A Job Search Engine Based on Occupation Vectors and a Job Identification Model

    An Example of Job Search at Google:

    job search example

    For a two week period, Google was granted patents with the same name each of those 2 weeks. This is the first of the two patents during that period granted under the name “Search Engine.”

    It is about a specific type of search engine. One that focuses upon a specific search vertical – A Job Search Engine.

    The second patent granted under the name “Search Engine,” was one that focused upon indexing data related to applications on mobile devices. I wrote about it in the post A Native Application Vertical Search Engine at Google

    The reason why I find it important to learn about and understand how these new “Search Engine” patents work is that they adopt some newer approaches to answering searches than some of the previous vertical search engines developed by Google. Understanding how they work may provide some ideas about how older searches at Google may have changed.

    This Job Search Engine patent works with a job identification model to enhance job search by improving the quality of search results in response to a job search query.

    We are told that the job identification model can identify relevant job postings that could otherwise go unnoticed by conventional algorithms due to inherent limitations of keyword-based searching. What implications does this have for organic search at Google that has focused upon keyword search?

    This job search may use methods in addition to conventional keyword-based searching. It uses an identification model that can identify relevant job postings which include job titles that do not match the keywords of a received job search query.

    So, the patent tells us that in a query using the words “Patent Guru,” the job identification model may identify postings related to a:

    • “Patent Attorney”
    • “Intellectual Property Attorney”
    • “Attorney”
    • the like

    The method behind job searching may include (remember the word “vector.” It is one I am seeing from Google a lot lately):

    • Defining a vector vocabulary
    • Defining an occupation taxonomy includings multiple different occupations
    • Obtaining multiple labeled training data items, wherein each labeled training data item is associated with at least:
      • (i) a job title
      • (ii) an occupation
    • Generating an occupation vector which includes a feature weight for each respective term in the vector vocabulary
    • Associating each respective occupation vector with an occupation in the occupation taxonomy based on the occupation of the labeled training data item used to generate the occupation vector
    • Receiving a search query that includes a string related to a characteristic of one or more potential job opportunities, generating a first vector based on the received query
    • Determining, for each respective occupation of the multiple occupations in the occupation taxonomy, a confidence score that is indicative of whether the query vector is correctly classified in the respective occupation
    • Selecting the particular occupation that is associated with the highest confidence score
    • Obtaining one or more job postings using the selected occupation
    • Providing the obtained job postings in a set of search results in response to the search query

    These operations may include:

  • Receiving a search query that includes a string related to a characteristic of one or more job opportunities
  • Generating, based on the query, a query vector that includes a feature weight for each respective term in a predetermined vector vocabulary
  • Determining, for each respective occupation of the multiple occupations in the occupation taxonomy, a confidence score that is indicative of whether the query vector is correctly classified in the respective occupation
  • Selecting the particular occupation that is associated with the highest confidence score
  • Obtaining one or more job postings using the selected occupation, and providing the obtained job postings in a set of search results in response to the search query
  • Feature Weights for Terms in Vector Vocabularies

    It sounds like Google is trying to understand job position titles and how they may be connected with each other, and developing a vector vocabulary, and build ontologies of related positions

    A feature weight may be based on:

    • A term frequency determined on a number of occurrences of each term in the job title of the training data item
    • An inverse occupation frequency that is determined based on a number of occupations in the occupation taxonomy where each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item is present.
    • An occupation derivative based on a density of each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item across each of the respective occupations in the occupation taxonomy
    • Both (i) a second value representing the inverse occupation frequency that is determined based, at least in part, on a number of occupations in the occupation taxonomy where each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item is present and (ii) a third value representing an occupation derivative that is based, at least in part, on a density of each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item across each of the respective occupations in the occupation taxonomy
    • A sum of (i) the second value representing the inverse occupation frequency, and (ii) one-third of the third value representing the occupation derivative

    The predetermined vector vocabulary may include terms that are present in training data items stored in a text corpus and terms that are not present in at least one training data item stored in the text corpus.

    This Job Search Engine Patent can be found at:

    Search engine
    Inventors: Ye Tian, Seyed Reza Mir Ghaderi, Xuejun Tao), Matthew Courtney, Pei-Chun Chen, and Christian Posse
    Assignee: Google LLC
    US Patent: 10,643,183
    Granted: May 5, 2020
    Filed: October 18, 2016

    Abstract

    Methods, systems, and apparatus, including computer programs encoded on storage devices, for performing a job opportunity search. In one aspect, a system includes a data processing apparatus, and a computer-readable storage device having stored thereon instructions that, when executed by the data processing apparatus, cause the data processing apparatus to perform operations.

    The operations include defining a vector vocabulary, defining an occupation taxonomy that includes multiple different occupations, obtaining multiple labeled training data items, wherein each labeled training data item is associated with at least (i) a job title, and (ii) an occupation, generating, for each of the respective labeled training data items, an occupation vector that includes a feature weight for each respective term in the vector vocabulary and associating each respective occupation vector with an occupation in the occupation taxonomy based on the occupation of the labeled training data item used to generate the occupation vector.

    The Job Identification Model

    Job identification model

    Job postings from many different sources may be related to one or more occupations.

    An occupation may include a particular category that encompasses one or more job titles that describe the same profession.

    Two or more of the obtained job postings may be related to the same, or substantially similar, occupation while using different terminology to describe a job title for each of the two or more particular job postings.

    Such differences in the terminology used to describe a particular job title of a job posting may arise for a variety of different reasons:

    • Different people from different employers draft each respective job posting
    • Unique job titles may be based on the culture of the employer’s company, the employer’s marketing strategy, or the like

    occupation taxonomy

    How an Job Identification Model May Work

    An example:

    1. At a first hair salon marketed as a rugged barbershop, advertises a job posting for a “barber”
    2. At a second hair salon marketed as a trendy beauty salon, advertises a job posting for a “stylist”
    3. At both, the job posting seeks a person for the occupation of a “hairdresser” who cuts and styles hair
    4. In a search system limited to keyword-based searching, a searcher seeking job opportunities for a “hairdresser” searchings for job opportunities using the term “barber” may not receive available job postings for a “stylist,” “hairdresser,” or the like if those job postings do not include the term “barber”
    5. The process in this patent uses a job identification model seeking to address this problem

    The job occupation model includes:

    • A classification unit
    • An occupation taxonomy

    The occupation taxonomy associates known job titles from existing job posts with one or more particular occupations.

    During training, the job identification model associates each occupation vector that was generated for an obtained job posting with an occupation in the occupation taxonomy.

    The classification unit may receive the search query and generate a query vector.

    The classification unit may access the occupation taxonomy and calculate, for each particular occupation in the occupation taxonomy, a confidence score that is indicative of the likelihood that the query vector is properly classified into each particular occupation of the multiple occupations in the occupation taxonomy.

    Then, the classification unit may select the occupation associated with the highest confidence score as the occupation that is related to the query vector and provide the selected occupation to the job identification model.

    An Example of a Search Under this Job Opportunities Search Engine:

    1. A searcher queries “Software Guru” into a search box
    2. The search query may be received by the job identification model
    3. The job identification model provides an input to the classification unit including the query
    4. The classification unit generates a query vector
    5. The classification unit analyzes the query vector in view of the one or more occupation vectors that were generated and associated with each particular occupation in the occupation taxonomy such as occupation vectors
    6. The classification unit may then determine that the query vector is associated with a particular occupation based on a calculated confidence score, and select the particular occupation
    7. The job identification model may receive the particular occupation from the classification unit
    8. Alternatively, or in addition, the output from the classification unit may include a confidence score that indicates the likelihood that the query vector is related to the occupation output by the occupation taxonomy
    9. The occupation output from the occupation taxonomy can be used to retrieve relevant job postings
    10. Specifically, given the output of a particular occupation, the job identification model can retrieve one or more job postings using a job posting index that stores references to job postings based on occupation type

    11. The references to job postings that were identified using the job posting index are returned to the user device
    12. The obtained references to job postings may be displayed on the graphical user interface
    13. The obtained references to job postings may be presented as search results and include references to job postings for a “Senior Programmer,” a “Software Engineer,” a “Software Ninja,” or the like
    14. The job postings included in the search results were determined to be responsive to the search query “Software Guru” based at least in part on the vector analysis of the query vector and one or more occupation vectors used to train the occupation taxonomy and not merely based on keyword searching alone

    Takeaways About this Job Search Engine

    In addition to the details about, the patent tells us how an occupation taxonomy may be trained, using training data. It also provides more details about the Job identification model. And then tells us about how a job search is performed using that job identification model.

    I mentioned above that this job search engine patent and the application search engine patent are using methods that we may see in other search verticals at Google. I have written about one approach that could be used in Organic search in the post Google Using Website Representation Vectors to Classify with Expertise and Authority

    Another one of those may involve image searching at Google. I’ve written about Google Image Search Labels Becoming More Semantic?

    I will be posting more soon about how Google Image search is using neural networks to categorize and cluster Images to return in search results.


    Copyright © 2020 SEO by the Sea ⚓. This Feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this material in your news aggregator, the site you are looking at may be guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact SEO by the Sea, so we can take appropriate action immediately.
    Plugin by Taragana

    Job Search Engine Using Occupation Vectors was originally posted by Video And Blog Marketing

    How To Start A Blog And Make Money

    Content

    Are you excited to start your own blog? Starting a blog is one of the best ways to make money, literally from anywhere. The internet has afforded us the freedom to be digital nomads and make an income from anywhere we choose to be in the world. The real truth is that anyone can start a blog in less than 30 minutes, by just buying hosting and installing WordPress. But here lies the actual challenge!

    For starters, most people that start a blog may not fathom the amount of work that’s waiting for them. It’s a steep learning curve that will require you to grasp a tremendous amount of information both on the technical side of blogging as well as your creative approach. Today, things are much more sophisticated and not the same as how people made money from blogging years ago. Fortunately, with this sophistication, lies an even higher potential for making money. From choosing a blog niche to a blogging platform and looking at ways to monetize your blog, there are a couple of things you’ll need to understand.

    How to Start a Blog

    Decide on a Niche and Target Market

    Your blog’s niche refers to the general topic of interest that you’ll be focusing your content on. These include topics like fashion, lifestyle, technology, food, travel, etc. For whichever blog niche that you are thinking about, come up with 5 to 10 keyword phrases that you could write about.

    Making your blog stand out online and make money requires you to grab the attention of your audience. You obviously can’t do that if in the first place you aren’t aware whose attention you want to grab or what even interests them. Put aside buying a domain name and hosting, if you don’t know who you want to serve then you’ll end up starting a business that serves no one, and this won’t do you any good. Niche choosing with a target market is predominantly one of the crucial reasons why blogs fail.

    Some important questions to ask when choosing a niche include;

    • What are you passionate in?
    • What do you currently do?
    • What do other people say you are good at?
    • Are there others doing the same thing?
    • How strong is the competition?
    • Do you have expertise in the niche?
    • How will you monetize it?
    • How much time and effort would it take to achieve your end goal or make money out of it?

    Choose a Reliable Webhost

    To get your blog online, you’ll need a blogging platform and a web hosting plan. For instance, if you’re just starting a new blog, you could use a WordPress blog hosted by Bluehost. WordPress is a user-friendly, free and powerful blogging software designed with usability and flexibility in mind.

    Your hosting is an integral building block for your blog. It’s kind of like the display rack that’s used in a retail store to showcase products. If your hosting goes down, even temporarily, or it’s not as fast or doesn’t do what you want it to do, then you stand to lose money as well as your audience. It’s important to choose the best hosting service for your blog with security, reliability, speed, flexibility and cost in mind. Alternative blog hosting platforms to consider include, Geekstorage, Siteground, HostGator, Dreamhost and Lyrical host.

    When buying hosting, make sure you buy your domain name separately so you can have the control needed to run your site without the interference of your webhost.

    Pick a Domain Name

    Domain name and web hosting are inseparable. Without a domain name, your blog won’t have an address. Securing your domain name further helps you focus and makes blogging feel all the more real. Take time to think through your domain name and especially aim to use a keyword that represents what your blog is about. Top qualities of a good domain usually are;

    • Brandable
    • Straightforward
    • Easy to pronounce
    • Easy to spell
    • Not restrictive

    Design Your Blog with a WordPress Theme

    Design is so important when it comes to your blog. Even if you don’t care for it, your readers will shift their behavior based on the features of your blog layout. In the world of blogging, WordPress designs are called themes. You can always use free themes to design your blog but for extra variety, go for paid themes.

    Now you are ready to take on the adventure. Create an about me page to introduce yourself to readers, and most importantly publish your first blog post!

    Content is King

    Content alone can make or break your blog. If your audience clicks over to your blog post and finds poor, low-quality content, then they won’t be reading, sharing, clicking through links and definitely won’t return to your site. Key to note here is that you have to write about things that your audience is actively searching for and not just the things you love. This you will know by getting to understand what your readers want by reading comments and knowing what they need. Solving a reader’s problem can eventually give tremendous returning traffic. As you consistently create engaging content, your tribe will continue to flock to you. A majority of your blog posts will be born out of your personal experiences, successes, failures, passions and new lessons.

    Tip: When looking for clever blog post ideas, consider doing the following;

    • Checking out forums like Reddit or Quora for fresh ideas
    • Signing up for Google Trends to get top trending news about your niche
    • Chatting with bloggers in your space and brainstorming fresh ideas
    • Talking about various lessons you have learned
    • Reflecting on common blogging mistakes in your niche and tactics that work

    Having a simple editorial calendar that provides a roadmap to always knowing what you are writing next is a smart way to prepare for what to publish. A serious blogger needs to prioritize consistency by all means without compromise. Creating content only when it’s convenient can lead you down a dangerous road. Think about it. If you have scheduled a doctor’s appointment in your calendar or even a business meeting with a client, you are going to honor it. If not, you will reschedule for the next available time-slot. The same applies to editorial calendars. Its purpose is to keep you organized and help you reach your end goals more easily in small micro-steps.

    Optimize Your Blog for Leads and Sales

    How is your blog set up and optimized for search engines? Optimizing your blog for SEO should never be ignored. The main intent of a search engine is to provide value to its users by presenting them with top quality websites that are easy to navigate and with good content. While your blogging platform, especially if it’s WordPress is by default SEO friendly, there are still a number of things to check and change to make it better. These include;

    • Blog structure
    • URL structure
    • Optimizing your category and tag pages
    • Website Speed
    • Mobile responsiveness
    • Webmaster tools SEO
    • ML Sitemap optimization
    • Use of Schema Markups

    As part of your SEO efforts, you should create engaging content for your audience and make this content more visible to search engines. To get your on-page SEO working, you’ll need to do things like;

    • Optimizing titles and description
    • Use videos, audio or images within your content
    • Use proper headings and post formatting
    • Apply the best internal linking practices for maximum SEO

    You can customize and optimize your blog through the use of plugins that can maximize on your blog’s functionality. For instance, you can use plugins to add contact forms, forums or sliders.

    Drive Traffic to Your Blog to Make Money

    To make money from your blog, you’ll need organic traffic. It’s, however not all about driving traffic to your site but converting what traffic you get into subscribers, buyers and followers. Well, considering you have made it this far, now is time to promote your content heavily and bring in new readers. Below are some strategies on how to create successful blogs that get you in front of new readers.

    Link Building – Link building is an extremely important aspect of getting more traffic from search engines. By having external links from other websites pointing to your website’s pages, you will get to rank higher in the SERPS. The most popular link building methods include;

    • Guest posting on relevant and more authoritative sites
    • Contacting other bloggers and introducing your website and content
    • Linking to other websites from your content and contacting them to let them know. If they find your website useful, they may opt to do the same for you.

    Use social media for your blog promotion – From Facebook to Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Reddit, LinkedIn, etc., there are a myriad of social media platforms to explore. However, don’t be pressured to promote your blog posts on every social media platform. The key insight here is to experiment yes, but determine the platforms that deliver the best returns/engagement. Pinterest has been mentioned by many bloggers as an effective platform to build a blog. You can create a cohesive profile with branded pin images, and people can get a sneak peek of who you are before going into your blog.

    Guest blogging on relevant sites like Quora or LinkedIn – Guest blogging in other authoritative sites in your niche is a sure way to connect with an already established network. So, look for places where your audience is and make your presence felt there, whether it’s on other blogs, communities or social platforms.

    Engage in forums and message boards for bloggers – Look for more targeted forums and online communities that relate to your niche on Facebook, LinkedIn or Reddit. Remember the critical thing here is to provide meaningful value before asking for anything in return, so engage and build relationships.

    Use an email newsletter to grow your audience further – An email newsletter is a proven and effective way to keep readers engaged and excited about what you do. It’s also a good driver of growth and revenue for any blog. Therefore, begin by building your email list by simply adding a signup form within your posts and across critical pages of your site so that your audience can get updates whenever you post new blog posts or have a resource to share. Consider signing up to an email marketing platform like ConvertKit, Aweber, MailChimp, or InfusionSoft to grow your email list.

    While at this, make sure that you are not just collecting emails without nurturing and adding value. Develop a small sequence of emails to keep your audience interest by sending them valuable information. Once they are settled in, send them an offer to a product. This is what marketers refer to as a sales funnel.

    Further, other key and creative ways to promote your blog include;

    • Interviewing people in your niche
    • Networking with other relevant bloggers or mentioning their blogs
    • Talking to people about what you’re doing
    • Learning from other top bloggers, looking at what works for them and figuring how to use or apply the knowledge.

    Blog Monetization

    Ultimately, you are out to make money with your blogging. But make no mistake, while this is your eventual goal when getting started, monetization shouldn’t be your number one focus. Building relationships and forming a community around your blog while delivering value should be your priority and starting kicker.

    Even still, it’s good to have an idea of how to make money while blogging. When you become well-versed on how to monetize your blog, you end up giving yourself the freedom to blog for the joy of it and the connections and networks come more organically. Let’s dive right in.

    Freelancing

    If you are looking to generate some income from your blog right away, freelancing is going to be the easiest option by far. To land your first freelancing gig, you’ll need to come up with a strong pitch, build out your key pages (About, Contact, Hire Me) and showcase your work through published posts. So, you may want to get started on creating those sample articles or other deliverables and host them on your blog. Once you get starting attention from brands, it’s important to know your worth. There are so many skills you could sell as a service, whether it’s in writing, design, social media management, photography, virtual assistance, SEO, paid advertising campaigns and more. What are your strengths? Do people struggle with it? Don’t hesitate to market your skills as people will always pay for the service if it means they won’t have to put in the work.

    Join Affiliate Marketing Programs

    Affiliate marketing is the most passive way to make money with a blog. You get to sell other people’s products (digital or physical) for a commission. With affiliate marketing, you are not only selling but helping people by including links to a product you love/use. Even as a new blogger, you can join affiliate marketing to gain access to top brands across different niches. As your blog grows, so does your potential for income. Here is how the process works;

    • Determine the products you would want to promote
    • Enroll in their affiliate marketing program to get a unique link and banners to use
    • Add the links/banners in your blog

    Whenever someone clicks on the links, they will be automatically directed to the provider’s website where they can make a purchase for you to get the agreed commission. There are many affiliate networks that connect bloggers with multiple companies that advertise via affiliate marketing. Among them include;

    • Amazon Associates
    • FlexOffers
    • CJ
    • ShareAsale
    • ImpactRadius

    If you can’t find your product on these networks, shoot the company an email and ask them which affiliate program you could find them.

    Ask Your Audience

    Another way to make money through blogging is to ask your audience. You can ask your audience to send some feedback at the end of your blog posts or send email blasts with a survey, using Google Forms, to gain valuable information on what your target audience needs. Your audience will most likely give you honest feedback that you can then use to develop a product or service to sell. E.g. a workout plan with targeted topics and routines they would be willing to pay for. Examples of digital products bloggers can create include; e-courses, online classes or workshops, Ebooks, premium content, photos, membership sites, audio or video, apps, plugins and themes, etc.

    Sell advertising Space

    Literally anyone can put an ad on their blog using Google Adsense. However, good money comes from selling ad spots on your website to corporations or what is commonly known as ad placement. If you build a high traffic blog, you can make a full-time income from this as advertisers will be willing to work with you to get exposure to your audience.

    Find Relevant Products and Freebies to Promote/ Sponsored Posts

    Here, companies will give a free product and hopefully monetary compensation, and you’ll be expected to highlight that product on your blog.

    With so many income stream options in blogging, it’s essential to plan your future revenue-driving strategy with the right forms of monetization techniques. More importantly, note that monetizing a blog takes time and relies on you having some traffic.

    And Finally

    Start a Blog with the End in Mind

    When you choose to invest in a business, you do it with an end in mind. Even when you go to college, you do it with a goal in mind. The same principle applies to blogging. You decide what you want from your blogging business and everything you do between now and your end goal must align with what you are aiming for. Most new bloggers make the mistake of trying random things in the hope they will find one that sticks, only to find themselves burnout before anything actually sticks.

    Create and Understand Your Sales Funnel

    Understanding your sales funnel is crucial as it helps you find the holes or places where your prospects fall off and never convert. Salesforce reports that a whopping 79% of marketing leads are never converted to sales mainly because 68% of businesses don’t have a clear sales funnel.

    Take, for example, a visitor lands on your blog through a Google search or social link. He/she may check out your blog posts or browse your product listings. As a prospect, you may offer him/her a chance to sign up for your email list. If the visitor fills out the form, he/she can be considered as a lead that could potentially return to your site when you contact them with special offers, information about new blog posts, or other intriguing resources. At this point, you will have turned them from casual visitors to someone who is actively engaging with your brand, making it a lot easier to make money from them.

    Key to note here is that your customers are on a journey that starts with learning about your business (awareness) and ends with them becoming clients or referring your blog or products to other people in their network.

    Have Multiple Streams of Income

    If your eventual goal is to make it big moneywise, then consider having multiple streams of income. This means that even if one strategy fails, then you have another to pick up the slack.

    Be Adaptable

    Successful bloggers continue to educate and update themselves as the world around them evolves. What’s popular and working now may not work in the future. Things change fast online. You, therefore, have to listen to your audience, track your statistics and figure out new ways to grow your blog even when it seems like everything is going wrong.

    Conclusion

    Starting a blog is incredibly easy. Creating a successful one that makes money requires a smarter approach that includes, hard work, dedication, SEO mastery and consistency. If you are a beginner and not sure how to start your blog, this article can be instrumental in pointing you in the right direction when it comes to creating a profitable blog.

    How To Start A Blog And Make Money was originally posted by Video And Blog Marketing

    Job Search Engine Using Occupation Vectors

    I worked for the Courts of Delaware at Superior Court.

    I started working there as the Assistant Criminal Deputy Prothonotary.

    I changed positions after 7 years there, and I became a Mini/Micro Computer Network Administrator.

    The Court used an old English title for that first position which meant that I supervised Court Clerks in the Criminal Department of the Court. In the second position, I never ever saw a mini/micro-computer but it was a much more technical position. I was reminded of those titles when writing this post.

    What unusual job titles might you have held in the past?

    A Job Search Engine Based on Occupation Vectors and a Job Identification Model

    For a two week period, Google was granted patents with the same name each of those 2 weeks. This is the first of the two patents during that period granted under the name “Search Engine.”

    It is about a specific type of search engine. One that focuses upon a specific search vertical – A Job Search Engine.

    The second patent granted under the name “Search Engine,” was one that focused upon indexing data related to applications on mobile devices. I wrote about it in the post A Native Application Vertical Search Engine at Google

    The reason why I find it important to learn about and understand how these new “Search Engine” patents work is that they adopt some newer approaches to answering searches than some of the previous vertical search engines developed by Google. Understanding how they work may provide some ideas about how older searches at Google may have changed.

    This Job Search Engine patent works with a job identification model to enhance job search by improving the quality of search results in response to a job search query.

    We are told that the job identification model can identify relevant job postings that could otherwise go unnoticed by conventional algorithms due to inherent limitations of keyword-based searching. What implications does this have for organic search at Google that has focused upon keyword search?

    This job search may use methods in addition to conventional keyword-based searching. It uses an identification model that can identify relevant job postings which include job titles that do not match the keywords of a received job search query.

    So, the patent tells us that in a query using the words “Patent Guru,” the job identification model may identify postings related to a:

    • “Patent Attorney”
    • “Intellectual Property Attorney”
    • “Attorney”
    • the like

    The method behind job searching may include (remember the word “vector.” It is one I am seeing from Google a lot lately):

    • Defining a vector vocabulary
    • Defining an occupation taxonomy includings multiple different occupations
    • Obtaining multiple labeled training data items, wherein each labeled training data item is associated with at least:
      • (i) a job title
      • (ii) an occupation
    • Generating an occupation vector which includes a feature weight for each respective term in the vector vocabulary
    • Associating each respective occupation vector with an occupation in the occupation taxonomy based on the occupation of the labeled training data item used to generate the occupation vector
    • Receiving a search query that includes a string related to a characteristic of one or more potential job opportunities, generating a first vector based on the received query
    • Determining, for each respective occupation of the multiple occupations in the occupation taxonomy, a confidence score that is indicative of whether the query vector is correctly classified in the respective occupation
    • Selecting the particular occupation that is associated with the highest confidence score
    • Obtaining one or more job postings using the selected occupation
    • Providing the obtained job postings in a set of search results in response to the search query

    These operations may include:

  • Receiving a search query that includes a string related to a characteristic of one or more job opportunities
  • Generating, based on the query, a query vector that includes a feature weight for each respective term in a predetermined vector vocabulary
  • Determining, for each respective occupation of the multiple occupations in the occupation taxonomy, a confidence score that is indicative of whether the query vector is correctly classified in the respective occupation
  • Selecting the particular occupation that is associated with the highest confidence score
  • Obtaining one or more job postings using the selected occupation, and providing the obtained job postings in a set of search results in response to the search query
  • Feature Weights for Terms in Vector Vocabularies

    It sounds like Google is trying to understand job position titles and how they may be connected with each other, and developing a vector vocabulary, and build ontologies of related positions

    A feature weight may be based on:

    • A term frequency determined on a number of occurrences of each term in the job title of the training data item
    • An inverse occupation frequency that is determined based on a number of occupations in the occupation taxonomy where each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item is present.
    • An occupation derivative based on a density of each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item across each of the respective occupations in the occupation taxonomy
    • Both (i) a second value representing the inverse occupation frequency that is determined based, at least in part, on a number of occupations in the occupation taxonomy where each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item is present and (ii) a third value representing an occupation derivative that is based, at least in part, on a density of each respective term in the job title of the respective training data item across each of the respective occupations in the occupation taxonomy
    • A sum of (i) the second value representing the inverse occupation frequency, and (ii) one-third of the third value representing the occupation derivative

    The predetermined vector vocabulary may include terms that are present in training data items stored in a text corpus and terms that are not present in at least one training data item stored in the text corpus.

    This Job Search Engine Patent can be found at:

    Search engine
    Inventors: Ye Tian, Seyed Reza Mir Ghaderi, Xuejun Tao), Matthew Courtney, Pei-Chun Chen, and Christian Posse
    Assignee: Google LLC
    US Patent: 10,643,183
    Granted: May 5, 2020
    Filed: October 18, 2016

    Abstract

    Methods, systems, and apparatus, including computer programs encoded on storage devices, for performing a job opportunity search. In one aspect, a system includes a data processing apparatus, and a computer-readable storage device having stored thereon instructions that, when executed by the data processing apparatus, cause the data processing apparatus to perform operations.

    The operations include defining a vector vocabulary, defining an occupation taxonomy that includes multiple different occupations, obtaining multiple labeled training data items, wherein each labeled training data item is associated with at least (i) a job title, and (ii) an occupation, generating, for each of the respective labeled training data items, an occupation vector that includes a feature weight for each respective term in the vector vocabulary and associating each respective occupation vector with an occupation in the occupation taxonomy based on the occupation of the labeled training data item used to generate the occupation vector.

    The Job Identification Model

    Job identification model

    Job postings from many different sources may be related to one or more occupations.

    An occupation may include a particular category that encompasses one or more job titles that describe the same profession.

    Two or more of the obtained job postings may be related to the same, or substantially similar, occupation while using different terminology to describe a job title for each of the two or more particular job postings.

    Such differences in the terminology used to describe a particular job title of a job posting may arise for a variety of different reasons:

    • Different people from different employers draft each respective job posting
    • Unique job titles may be based on the culture of the employer’s company, the employer’s marketing strategy, or the like

    occupation taxonomy

    How an Job Identification Model May Work

    An example:

    1. At a first hair salon marketed as a rugged barbershop, advertises a job posting for a “barber”
    2. At a second hair salon marketed as a trendy beauty salon, advertises a job posting for a “stylist”
    3. At both, the job posting seeks a person for the occupation of a “hairdresser” who cuts and styles hair
    4. In a search system limited to keyword-based searching, a searcher seeking job opportunities for a “hairdresser” searchings for job opportunities using the term “barber” may not receive available job postings for a “stylist,” “hairdresser,” or the like if those job postings do not include the term “barber”
    5. The process in this patent uses a job identification model seeking to address this problem

    The job occupation model includes:

    • A classification unit
    • An occupation taxonomy

    The occupation taxonomy associates known job titles from existing job posts with one or more particular occupations.

    During training, the job identification model associates each occupation vector that was generated for an obtained job posting with an occupation in the occupation taxonomy.

    The classification unit may receive the search query and generate a query vector.

    The classification unit may access the occupation taxonomy and calculate, for each particular occupation in the occupation taxonomy, a confidence score that is indicative of the likelihood that the query vector is properly classified into each particular occupation of the multiple occupations in the occupation taxonomy.

    Then, the classification unit may select the occupation associated with the highest confidence score as the occupation that is related to the query vector and provide the selected occupation to the job identification model.

    An Example of a Search Under this Job Opportunities Search Engine:

    1. A searcher queries “Software Guru” into a search box
    2. The search query may be received by the job identification model
    3. The job identification model provides an input to the classification unit including the query
    4. The classification unit generates a query vector
    5. The classification unit analyzes the query vector in view of the one or more occupation vectors that were generated and associated with each particular occupation in the occupation taxonomy such as occupation vectors
    6. The classification unit may then determine that the query vector is associated with a particular occupation based on a calculated confidence score, and select the particular occupation
    7. The job identification model may receive the particular occupation from the classification unit
    8. Alternatively, or in addition, the output from the classification unit may include a confidence score that indicates the likelihood that the query vector is related to the occupation output by the occupation taxonomy
    9. The occupation output from the occupation taxonomy can be used to retrieve relevant job postings
    10. Specifically, given the output of a particular occupation, the job identification model can retrieve one or more job postings using a job posting index that stores references to job postings based on occupation type

    11. The references to job postings that were identified using the job posting index are returned to the user device
    12. The obtained references to job postings may be displayed on the graphical user interface
    13. The obtained references to job postings may be presented as search results and include references to job postings for a “Senior Programmer,” a “Software Engineer,” a “Software Ninja,” or the like
    14. The job postings included in the search results were determined to be responsive to the search query “Software Guru” based at least in part on the vector analysis of the query vector and one or more occupation vectors used to train the occupation taxonomy and not merely based on keyword searching alone

    Takeaways About this Job Search Engine

    In addition to the details about, the patent tells us how an occupation taxonomy may be trained, using training data. It also provides more details about the Job identification model. And then tells us about how a job search is performed using that job identification model.

    I mentioned above that this job search engine patent and the application search engine patent are using methods that we may see in other search verticals at Google. I have written about one approach that could be used in Organic search in the post Google Using Website Representation Vectors to Classify with Expertise and Authority

    Another one of those may involve image searching at Google. I’ve written about Google Image Search Labels Becoming More Semantic?

    I will be posting more soon about how Google Image search is using neural networks to categorize and cluster Images to return in search results.


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    Job Search Engine Using Occupation Vectors was originally posted by Video And Blog Marketing

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 [14 Proven Tactics]

    SEO

    Search Engine Optimization, or SEO, is one of the best ways to get visitors to your website and boost sales in 2020. That’s because more than half of trackable website traffic comes from organic search.

    But you might be wondering how you’re supposed to stand out from the crowd now that everybody and their grandmother is optimizing their websites for search.

    Unfortunately, Google’s frequent search algorithm updates make it difficult to keep up with the best tactics and strategies. And with SEO becoming a standard part of digital marketing strategies for most businesses, competition is fierce.

    In this article, we’re going to help improve your SEO performance for 2020. You’ll learn several up-to-date best practices for crafting an effective SEO strategy for your business. Use these modern practices to reshape your SEO game and propel your business to the top of the search engine results page.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #1: Publish High-Quality Content

    Content is the backbone of a successful SEO campaign and the heart of on-page SEO. But you can’t just pop some content on your website and expect it to pay out SEO gold continuously.

    You have to update it. Like, a lot.

    The reason for that is simple. If you want to drive increased traffic, you have to drive repeat traffic (new and returning visitors). You have to give people a reason to come back.

    And Google knows this. Regularly-updated content is essential to scoring big with the world’s largest search engine.

    But the content also has to be good.

    When we say quality content, we mean a few things:

    • Persuasive, engaging writing with no errors.
    • New and up-to-date information.
    • Copy that is relevant to your business.

    It’s also a great idea to repurpose old content, updating it as things change in your business and your industry. Just make sure you’re updating and not repeating. Google hates duplicate content.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #2: Target Keywords People are Searching For

    When marketing to your audience, you have to understand how they think, how they shop, and, most importantly, how they search.

    You should be able to understand what your target demographic is searching for on Google. That way, you can optimize your pages for those specific key terms.

    Using an SEO tool like Google’s Keyword Planner will show you a list of relevant and high-volume target keywords.

    Of course, much like the quality content you’ll be writing, the terms that you chase have to be relevant to your business.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #3: Improve The User Experience

    Stellar user experience is essential when trying to get your website ranked highly on Google.

    Think of it this way. Google is one of the most trusted, known, and respected companies on the planet. When you type a search into Google’s search engine, you’re getting a series of recommendations from Google.

    If Google’s number one recommendation was a site that was lacking in content and not user friendly, then Google’s reputation just took a small hit. That’s why Google vets the sites that it lists so thoroughly, taking user experience into account.

    So, how do you improve your user experience in a way that will impress both Google and your potential customers?

    • Write short easy to read paragraphs
    • Include headers throughout your content to make it easier to skim
    • Provide images as a visual representation of your content
    • Increase the speed of your site. The faster it loads, the lower your bounce rate will be.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #4: Make Your Site Responsive

    Your site has to work for mobile devices.

    That’s not an opinion; it’s a fact in 2020.

    To illustrate, in 2019, 63% of Google’s U.S. searches were done on a mobile device. That means the bulk of searches on the largest search engine in existence are done on phones, tablets, and other mobile-ready devices.

    According to the social media tool HootSuite, mobile internet use has been steadily increasing over the last five years.

    (Image Source)

    As such, you must optimize your site for mobile users. Failure to do so will lose you some significant points with Google.

    A lack of mobile functionality is a severe blow to the user experience, which we already covered in the previous section.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #5: Improve Click-Through Rate

    You want to make sure that when someone stumbles upon your listing on Google, they’re going to click on your link and follow it to your site.

    There are a few ways to ensure that your click-through rate improves.

    For starters, you should be writing titles that stand out and make the user want to follow your link. A compelling description and meta description also go a long way toward making a user click on your link. You have to draw them in with compelling optimized copy.

    The trick is writing compelling content with limited space. You only have 65 characters for your headline. To make it compelling, you need to:

    • Make sure it is optimized with keywords. You should have some of your more important keywords toward the front of your titles and descriptions as people tend to skim content.
    • Make sure that you’re painting a clear picture about what you do.
    • Try to appeal to some kind of customer pain point to elicit an emotional response.
    • You could also always use our CTR Grader which tells you what you need to improve to increase CTR.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #6: Build Backlinks to Your Site

    A backlink is a link featured on another website that links back to yours. It is one of the most critical aspects of Search Engine Optimization, and it is where most SEO campaigns fall apart. Another term for backlinks is inbound links.

    A backlink is only useful if it comes from a credible source with good standing on Google. But, it also has to be relevant to your industry. If you’re a plumber and you get a backlink from a video game review website, it’s not going to help you.

    One of the best ways to create backlinks is to write blog articles about your industry that contain links back to your site and shop those articles around to different sites.

    Another way to go about it would be to create linkable assets, something that a person would use as a source when writing an article on your subject. A great example of a linkable asset would be something like an infographic.

    You also need to have several internal links on your site. These are links on your site that connect to other pages on your website.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #7: Demonstrate Expertise

    Because Google is recommending you to its users, it wants to ensure that you are an expert and that your words have weight and legitimacy.

    Google’s algorithm heavily focuses on an acronym called E-A-T. That stands for expertise, authority, and trustworthiness.

    (Image Source)

    You can demonstrate your expertise in a lot of ways. One of the most effective ways of showing that you’re an expert or an authority in your field is by creating blog content. If that blog ends up becoming a linkable resource for others, that works out even better in your favor because it shows Google that other movers and shakers in your industry value your opinion.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #8: Optimize Your Images

    Google loves to see that you have images, but unfortunately, that’s all it can see.

    By that, we mean that Google’s search bots can’t actually see the content of an image. They can see that an image exists, but they can’t look at a photo of a firetruck and say, “that’s a photo of a firetruck.”

    It’s up to us to help them by optimizing images to tell Google’s bots precisely what is on your page. Every image should have a title tag and an alt tag. This is an opportunity for you to write a brief description of the image, featuring a target keyword or two.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #9: Incorporate Other Media

    You’re going to need more than just fancy pictures if you want to improve your SEO ranking. There’s a ton of awesome media that you can incorporate onto your site. Google will reward you for it.

    Video content should be a central focus of your site. A massive 92% of marketers who are using video on their website say that it is an important part of their overall strategy. What’s more, it’s estimated that by 2021, the average internet user will spend more than 100 minutes per day watching videos online.

    (Image Source)

    Google owns YouTube, which is the world’s most popular video sharing service. They make it very easy to incorporate YouTube videos onto your site and will reward you for doing so.

    There’s also audio content. Consider starting a podcast and featuring it on your site. Podcasting is a valuable medium that people enjoy. Associating your product and page with a podcast will help your brand both with customers and with Google.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #10: Feature Outbound Links

    When you use outbound links on your site, you’re able to increase your credibility because you’re citing sources.

    It’s one thing to make claims on your site, but it’s another altogether to back them up with facts.

    If you were just to say that Barry Bonds has the most career home runs in major league baseball, that’s all well and good. But, if you were to say that Barry Bonds is the all-time home run leader with 762 home runs, backed by a link, you’ve proven yourself more credible.

    Google looks for outbound links in your content because they want to make sure that you’re double-checking all of your facts and offering valuable and accurate information to its users.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #11: Fix Broken Links

    Google doesn’t like to see broken links. They can seriously hurt your SEO score.

    One of the best ways to ensure that you’re featuring strong links is to only link out to authority websites. These don’t tend to go anywhere. However, it is still possible that an article or infographic you’ve linked out to might be taken down, leaving you with a broken link.

    It’s important to do periodic link audits on your entire site to ensure that all of your links are live. But that doesn’t mean you have to go page by page clicking on every link.

    The website Dead Link Checker works well to check either your entire site all at once or just a single page. What’s more, it’s a totally free service.

    By keeping track of your links and making sure that they’re all in working order, you should have no problem avoiding a potentially disastrous SEO pitfall.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #12: Encourage Visitors to Share Content

    Sharing is caring, especially when it comes to your website content.

    You need a social media presence in the modern business world, and social media is built on the idea of content sharing.

    However, social media can also be one of the most significant SEO ranking factors. If people share links to your site on social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, your organic search traffic and SEO ranking will go up.

    The content that you post, whether it be an infographic or a blog post, should have some kind of social sharing icon included.

    It can also help to incentivize sharing. Do some kind of contest where entry requires each participant to share a link on their social media pages.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #13: Set Up a Google Business Page

    If you’re trying to improve your local SEO, it’s important to set up a Google My Business page. This is especially true for businesses that have a physical brick and mortar location.

    It only takes a few minutes to set up. You add information on your business, including contact info, images, and more. People can also leave reviews for you there.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 #14: Monitor Analytics

    You need to know how your SEO ranking is doing if your campaign is going to succeed. That’s why we recommend performing an SEO audit and SEO analysis regularly.

    It’s important to check your SEO analytics regularly because that’s the only way to know if your efforts are paying off.

    If you check your analytics and you’re getting no movement, then your current strategy is not working, and it’s time to try something new.

    If you see that you’re steadily rising through the ranks, it means that what you’re doing is the right thing and to stay the course.

    One of the best ways to do this is by using Google Analytics. It can quickly become one of your best SEO tools.

    Conclusion

    By utilizing these proven modern SEO tips and best practices, your business will be able to compete more effectively on the SEO battlefield and drive more traffic onto your website from Google.

    Search engines can be a powerful tool for a business, but in order to use this tool, you have to know how it works.

    Spend some time implementing the action items on this list. These are proven strategies — ways that businesses like yours are already succeeding. When implemented correctly, they can help land your website at the top of search results. The first step is an SEO audit to understand where you currently are and how you can improve.

    If you’re still unsure where to start or all of this sounds like a bit too much to handle on your own, take a look at some of the SEO services we have to offer at Higher Visibility and how we can help improve your website’s SEO.

    How to Improve Your SEO in 2020 [14 Proven Tactics] was originally posted by Video And Blog Marketing

    SEO Checklist: Optimizing After A Core Update

    Last updated on

    Google May 2020 Update Officially Over_Cover Photo

    There have been plenty of Google updates but you may think, “Why can’t SEOs shut up about this one?”. The May 2020 Core Update has been rolled out in a time when digital has become colossal in the lives of people with many e-commerce sites and social media marketplaces seeing a surge in business from this avenue. With that, competition is more vicious than ever as many digital marketers clamor to find ways to achieve that top spot.

    google update

    I have written about this last week to say who are the probable winners and losers from this update. Now, it has been a full two-week roll out as Google announced in their Twitter account that the update is finally over. As the search engine constantly revamps itself, marketers should be adaptable to the algorithmic changes that it undergoes. Knowing this, how can you cope with the effects of this universal update?

    Personally, I believe in going back to the basics and reverse engineer it from there. What are the elements that you should look at once you’ve been hit by the May 2020 update or any update for that matter? Find out here.

    Organic Search Results

    The first thing you look at when there is an update is whether or not you slipped off your most-coveted rankings. It sucks when an algorithm change can mess up your hard work and you cannot do anything about it because it’s the system. If you are in panic mode because you’ve been hit by the update, it’s okay because this means that you are following the rules and sticking to white-hat strategies for your SEO. For those who game the system and employ black-hat tactics, they may feel as if they are vulnerable if they do not experience the same loss due to an update but I guarantee that they will suffer a grave consequence for their unethical acts.

    Once you see that you have lost your place in the first or second page, then it’s time to go to work and see why it went wrong. Even if the May 2020 update has come to a close, this is not the end of your job to maintain a high-quality site. Start with checking if you are indeed relevant for the search term that you want to rank for. You cannot choose keywords just because. Go back to the foundation of your SEO strategy and research relevant keywords to your business, options that will generate more ROI in the long run.

    Traffic

    Updates usually make themselves known by that little curve downward or high wave in your traffic analytics report. The sudden loss in the number of users going into your site may or may not be a consequential effect of your ranking drop. Either way, this is still an important element that you should look at after an update. This will help you see which areas of your site will need your attention. It would be very helpful if you check which pages have lost the most traffic and optimize from there. Usually, this doesn’t mean that you are not relevant for users, the reason may be attributed to users finding it hard to find your pages due to a ranking drop. Navigational keywords are your best bet in recovering from this. Recover by catering to the users who have previously found your page and take them back to the pages that serve them with the most relevant information.

    Featured Snippets

    With the recent Core Update, there are webmasters who shared their accounts of missing featured snippets. If you have secured a position in a featured snippet for your query, you might want to check if you are hit by the algorithm update by getting kicked out of the featured snippet section. Optimize for it by following a solid content strategy that will help you succeed in securing a place in the featured snippet. The benefits of having a spot in a featured snippet are unmatched so this will be an area that you need to focus on.

    Site Speed and Security

    High-quality sites optimize best for user experience, which is why you should also look out for your site’s speed and security. Page load times can be a killer if you have a slow site causing your user to exit and look for information somewhere else. Same with Site Security, if a user finds out that he is unsafe while browsing your site, you should expect that it would not be a great experience for them. Core updates crack down on sites that are not proven to be of value to users so a way for you to come out strong from this is to optimize for people. It may be a daunting task trying to hit two birds with one stone, but algorithm updates are there as guides on how you can serve your audience better.

    Key Takeaway

    Having a checklist for SEO should be your priority, especially if you are in the middle of a turbulent update. With this in mind, make sure that you do not over-optimize or neglect the most important elements for your online visibility. Updates are there for a reason, you have to make sure that you are properly optimizing your site for the best user experience and the highest-ranking position in the search engine. What are your thoughts on the fully rolled out Google update and what are the things you include on your checklist? Comment down below!

    SEO Checklist: Optimizing After A Core Update was originally posted by Video And Blog Marketing

    Is Video Marketing Good for SEO?

    Three reasons why video should be part of your SEO strategy

    For years marketers have been talking about video in marketing. The rise of video..the importance of video.. everyone should be watching out for video. And they’re right. People are watching more videos than ever, so It’s safe to say that it’s a worthy investment for just about any brand. In fact, it’s one of the most important trends for 2020. The good news is that you can produce any number of types of videos depending on your niche: Vlogs, ads, product videos, live videos, webinars, testimonials…the list goes on. It’s just a matter of figuring out which type will work best for your business, and what makes the most sense for your customers. 

    But what about organic traffic? Can you use video marketing for SEO? While there are a few different factors to consider (your audience, the industry, the size of your business and the purpose of the videos), the short answer is YES. That’s because video is the preferred way to consume information.  

    What is video SEO?

    Before I talk about why video is good for SEO, I’ll explain what video SEO is. Video SEO is the process of optimizing your video to help search engines understand what’s on your page and in your video. In doing so, the search engine can match your relevant content with a user’s query. A great way to do this is to add schema markup to your video, preferably JSON-LD. 

    By adding this metadata, you’re telling search engines things like:

    • Tite
    • Description
    • Length
    • Image thumbnail
    • And transcript (if available, which we highly recommend!)

    Here’s an example of VideoObject schema provided by Google

    A few tips: 

    1. Use schemas provided by schema.org which was founded by Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and Yandex
    2. To ensure that the search engine can read your markup, you can use Google’s structured data testing tool. 
    3. Make sure you’ve got all your ducks in a row when it comes to Google’s best practices

    Other SEO factors to keep in mind: 

    • Thumbnails: Make sure the thumbnail is still viewable when shrunken down to 116 x 65 pixels, it is a JPG or PNG and is accessible by Googlebot.
    • Title: If your video is located on a landing page, do not make the title of the video the same as the title of that page. Additionally, your title should match the title provided in the schema markup
    • Transcripts: Transcripts, which can be uploaded into the schema markup, are great for accessibility purposes and they help Google understand the content of the video.
    • Make sure Google can crawl your video! They currently support the following video file types: .3g2, .3gp2, .3gp, .3gpp, .asf, .avi, .divx, .f4v, .flv, .m2v,, .m3u8, .m4v, .mkv, .mov, .mp4, .mpe, .mpeg, .mpg, .ogv, .qvt, .ram, .rm, .vob, .webm, .wmv, .xap

    With so much video content on the internet after the YouTube boom, how can anyone get any views?! Google has released detailed instructions about how to achieve this as well as its standards when it comes to getting your video found by users. However, going into detail about this deserves a whole post of its own. For now, I’ll delve into three reasons I think you should be using video as part of your SEO strategy in 2020. 

    Video Drives Conversion and Lowers Bounce Rates

    I hate to point out the obvious, but the goal for any business is conversions. Whether that’s someone signing up for a demo, purchasing a product, or subscribing to your blog. Conversions are important, they keep the bus moving. According to 2018’s video marketing stats, 84% of consumers stated that they were convinced to purchase a product after watching a product video and that including a video on your landing page, can increase conversion rates up to 80%. 

    Not only does video drive conversion, it lowers bounce rates on pages. Wistia conducted their own study and found that on average, people spent 2.6x longer on a page with a video than one without. 

    Featured Snippets and Video Answers

    Google loves video. Why? Because people love video. Moovly released statistics outlining that you’re 50 times more likely to show up on the SERP if you have a video embedded on your site. This may come as no surprise after Google announced the acquisition of YouTube in 2006, but it’s still a staggering number nonetheless. And what do featured snippets and video answers contribute to? Organic traffic.

    Links and Shares

    SEO comes down to links (the good kind) and content, right? And as I mentioned before, people prefer consuming video information rather than reading it. A blog post that has a video will attract 33 times more inbound links than a page without one. And social videos are 12 times more likely to be shared than images and text COMBINED. So, quality content paired with video content is an excellent way to obtain links or get your content shared.

    Not all platforms are equal.

    Yes, Google owns YouTube. And YouTube can do wonders for your organic traffic business goals. But there are other platforms that might be better tailored to your individual needs. Keep this in mind when you’re deciding what the purpose of your videos are and where you want to host them.

    Youtube: This is a free platform with a built-in audience. YouTube videos also often get prime real estate on the SERPs, because well, Google owns it. 

    Wistia: This is the best platform for video marketing. A couple benefits of Wistia is that they create the JSON-LD markup for you, and you can personalize your videos to your brand. This makes it a prime candidate when thinking about video SEO and brand awareness. 

    Vimeo: Vimeo is a great candidate for social platforms or collaboration. You can access analytics, share and collaborate on a video with your team or client and you can give access to anyone, even those who don’t pay for vimeo. 

    Now, this was a very quick rundown of the top three platforms and what I believe they offer to your business. However if you’d like a more thorough rundown with different options, check out this Zapier post.

    Takeaway

    Video is in, and it’s here to stay. People are watching more video than ever. Google is increasing the amount of video answers they serve to users. If you’re thinking about jumping on this train then you should! 

    Just remember: 

    • Figure out what your target audience is
    • Create quality videos catered to them 
    • Use schema markup and keep SEO factors in mind 
    • Choose the right platform for your business goals

    Is Video Marketing Good for SEO? was originally posted by Video And Blog Marketing

    12 Best Practices for Technical SEO

    Last updated on

    Technical SEO is one of the most exciting parts of SEO in my opinion and certainly one of the most crucial ones. There is a unique satisfaction you could get when you see Google indexing more and more pages of your website. At the same time, it feels like you’re walking on a field of landmines and one mistake can make your website virtually gone on search engines.

    Sounds scary right? But don’t worry, this guide is written to make sure that you don’t step on a landmine.

    Just because it has “technical” in its name doesn’t mean you need to have developer skills to do it but you will need assistance from a web developer from time to time. You might not realize it yet but you’re probably doing it already since technical SEO  is part of a regular SEO audit you should be doing. In this article, I will walk you through technical SEO and its best practices. 

    What is Technical SEO?

    Technical SEO is the process of optimizing a website to make it easier for search engines to crawl and index. Generally, it also includes any technical aspects of SEO. Not only does technical SEO guarantees your website appears on search engine results but it also highly affects your rankings.

    1. Check for Noindex Tags

    The noindex tag is used to tell search engines to not show a specific page on the search results. Meaning if you have a great piece of content that is ranking really well and you accidentally add a noindex tag on it, it might disappear from the search results in a few days. Make sure that all of your important pages are indexable and only use the noindex tag when necessary. To check if a page has a noindex tag on it, you could simply go to its source code and find a noindex tag or use install browser tools/extensions to make things faster. 

    2. Check your Robots.txt File

    The robots.txt file is used to block search engine bots from crawling URLs that are specified in the file. You could use the robots.txt file to prevent search engine bots to enter certain parts of your website for security purposes or if you want a certain section of your site to not appear in the search results.

    By default, your site’s robots.txt file can be seen by adding robots.txt on your domain: “https://yourwebsitehere.com/robots.txt”.

    Take note that once Google already indexes a page and you want to remove it from the search results, you should put a noindex tag on it first then block it through the robots.txt file to prevent it from being crawled again.

    3. Secure your Website

    Installing an SSL (secure sockets layer) certificate on your website is one of the basic technical SEO optimizations that you can do. In fact, making your website on HTTPS is one of the most known minor ranking factors. Not only does this affect rankings but it may also affect user experience. Browsers may show a warning message to a user before entering a non-secured website. This can scare away users and it’s definitely a loss of traffic.

    4. Submit your Website on Google Search Console

    Submitting your website to Google Search Console (GSC) should be the first thing that you need to do once your website is up and running. Verifying your website on Google Search Consoles guarantees that your website appears on the search results. There are a lot of other benefits as well. Having your website on GSC allows you to monitor your organic clicks and impressions. Google will also notify you of errors when crawling and indexing your website through GSC.

    5. Have a Proper XML Sitemap

    An XML sitemap file is the list of all URLs on your website. You then submit the sitemap to Google Search Console. Google treats all URLs in the sitemap as priorities for crawling. You could easily install an XML sitemap by downloading a plugin and from there, you can control what pages are excluded or included in the sitemap.

    6. Optimize URL Slugs

    Optimizing the URL slugs of your pages is one of the easiest tasks to do for technical SEO and it is also an important one. It can affect your rankings since it is a place where you could add your target keyword and it makes your website look good for users. Optimize URL slugs by making it clean and easy to understand and refrain from using random letters and numbers.

    7. Optimize Site Speed

    Optimizing your website’s speed is always the way to go. Not only does it affect rankings, but also it affects user experience. You could use tools such as GTmetrix or Google’s PageSpeed Insights to check your website’s site speed and get recommendations on how you could further improve it.

    For this one, you might need the assistance of a web developer on your team. But as an SEO, you could also do optimizations yourself such as compressing images, installing site speed optimization plugins, or moving to a faster hosting provider.

    8. Make Your Website Mobile-Friendly

    You might also need the assistance of a web developer on this one. Having a mobile-friendly website should be a top priority. Google gives high importance on mobile usability and it is known to be one of the top ranking factors. And since a large number of users come from mobile phones, it is best to make your website easier to use for them. Alternatively, you could use AMP or accelerated mobile pages to easily make mobile versions of your pages. 

    9. Remove Links to Dead Pages

    Linking to dead pages or 404 pages is a waste of link juice. Always be on the lookout for outbound links to 404 pages and make sure to update them and link them to live pages. If there is an internal link on your website to a page that you deleted or does not exist, search engines might be confused and you might see coverage errors on your GSC report. Use SEO crawlers to find links to dead pages and update them immediately.

    10. Look for Orphaned Pages

    Orphaned pages are pages that are not linked from other pages of your website or are not part of your website’s link ecosystem. This makes it hard for search engine bots to crawl and index these pages. You could use SEO crawl tools like Screaming Frog and Netpeak Spider to look for orphaned pages and check if these pages have any value.

    11. Implement Structured Data Markup

    While structured data doesn’t affect rankings directly, it certainly helps search engines have a better understanding of your website and its contents. Having the right structured data markup enables your website to have rich snippets in search results and boost your click-through rate. You could use Google’s structured data testing tool to make sure that the markup you implemented has no errors and is accepted by Google.

    12. Check your Canonical Tags

    Canonical tags are known to be an advanced SEO strategy as it requires careful implementation. Like the noindex tag and robots.txt, improper canonicalization of pages in your website can massively affect how Google crawls and indexes your website.

    A canonical tag is used to denote that a page has the same contents as the page it is canonical to. By default, all pages should be self-canonical. For example, this post: https://seo-hacker.com/google-may-2020-core-update/ should have the code <link rel=”canonical” href=”https://seo-hacker.com/google-may-2020-core-update/”> in it.

    Should you want to set a different canonical to a page, you could use tools like YoastSEO or you could ask your developer to implement the code on different pages. In my experience, canonical tags are mostly used on e-commerce websites as they tend to have multiple product listings with minimal differences with each other.

    Take note that if you want to check if Google is reading your canonical tags correctly, you can use the URL inspection tool on Google Search Console, click on Coverage and it will indicate the user-declared canonical and Google-selected canonical. Google always follows the user-declared canonical but in some cases, Google’s bot would select its own canonical because it may find similar pages on your website. 

    Key Takeaway

    And there you have it! Thirteen best practices for technical SEO. I hope this guide made you realize that technical SEO isn’t as hard as it seems but is definitely essential and must be done thoroughly and with care. A technically sound website can be the difference between your SEO success or failure. Make sure that you follow these best practices and improve your website rankings.

    12 Best Practices for Technical SEO was originally posted by Video And Blog Marketing